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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  August 25, 2016 2:02am-4:01am EDT

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melanoma. >> people of color think we won't have sun damage or the sun doesn't affect us because we're darker skin and it's not true.
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y23ivy yi0y closed captioning and other consideration for "extra"
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well that's going to do it for today's "extra." for the latest entertainment news head over to extratv.com. we'll see you tomorrow, folks. next "extra," britney. rihanna. who will shock the censors at the vmas? >> how britney is gearing up for
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[ vocalizing ] [ buzzing ] [ tree crashes ] [ wind howling ] ?
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militants attacked the american university of afghanistan today. at least four people were killed. dozens wounded. none of them were american. the university was established in kabul ten years ago and has more than 1,000 students. more now from charlie d'agata. explosion blew one of the gates open. that was followed by heavy gunfire as militants stormed the campus during busy night classes. several american teachers and hundreds of students were on campus, some were struck by gunfire. others hid where they could. one jumped from a second story window to escape. among those trapped inside, was
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war for decades. the gunman was right outside his classroom. >> i sensed the man, the terrorist was going room by room. i felt that, okay, this is it. he couldn't open the door. he just threw the grenade inside. and then we jumped and then we ran, all of it probably in two or three minutes. >> reporter: cbs news producer, ahmad mukhtar was in class and sprinted for any way out. >> the gunfire was getting, closer, closer. bullets flying over my head. and that was, for a few seconds of that. and these bullets hit me or my friend. >> reporter: as the afghan security forces battled with the militants. u.s. military officials confirmed american advisers were on the side lines. despite being surrounded by 15-foot blast walls and armed patrols, this is the second
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>> it is not known who is behind the university attack, maurice, but it comes amid a surge in violence to. day the defense department identified the u.s. soldier who was killed in yesterday's roadside bomb, army staff sergeant, matthew thompson of sir vi irvine, california was on patrol in helman province. thompson was 28. >> charlie d'agata following developments from >> 76 days until the presidential election. donald trump took his campaign to a battleground state where he is fighting an uphill battle for votes among people of color. here is major garrett. ? proud to be an american ? >> reporter: donald trump rallied in pivotal central florida and said this about his new minority outreach. >> really great with voters. >> trump is trailing in florida by five points in the latest cbs poll. part of the problem, soft
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african-american voters. trump is trying to fix that by retooling his immigration message. one that began like this -- >> when mexico sends its people they're not sending their best. they're bringing drugs. they're bringing crime. they're rapists. >> during a televised townhall, trump backed away from repeated pledges to deport. >> there certainly can be a softening. we are not looking to hurt people. >> reporter: that clashes with trump's earlier emphasis on mass deportation. >> you are rounding them all up? >> we are rounding them uppen a humane, nice way. they're going to be happy because they want to be legalized. and by the way, i know it doesn't sound nice. but not everything is nice. >> it doesn't sound practical. >> reporter: trump says he will limit deportation orders to criminals without documentation. his runningmate indiana governor
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>> that means deporting all 11 million people. >> thing it means upholding the laws of the country and enforcing the laws. >> deportation force, is that your understanding? >> people who have run afoul of the law got to leave immediately. >> reporter: trump's immigration plans remain vague, hard to pin down. so too, maurice, the strategy of campaigning here in mississippi. trump trails in so many battleground states. >> major garrett with the trump hillary clinton is mining for money. julianna goldman has that. >> reporter: this may be all the public will see of hillary clinton today as she heads into a private fund raiser in california. instead of spending the end of august storming battleground states. clinton is on a money raising marathon to pay for the fall fight against donald trump. but her absence has kept her from turning the page on controversies over her e-mail and the clinton foundation. which has raised $2 billion to
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economic development. instead, she has opened herself up to attacks. >> it is impossible to tell where the clinton foundation ends and the state department begins. >> reporter: clinton's fund-raising highlights the apparent blurry lines between her family's charitable work and political ventures. of the 15 fundraisers clinton has held over the last week, more than half hosted by donors who have given to the foundation. including one today by apple ceo his co-host, executive vice president, lisa jackson is on the foundation board. while clinton is set to deliver a speech tomorrow in nevada her time away from the trail has given trump other ammunition. >> no press conference in what, 255 days. >> i think we are ready to take a few questions. >> that since december. she sat down for hundreds of interviews including with "60 minutes" last month. >> but she hasn't faced the sort
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in 2008 then senator obama held at least four press conferences. trump held at least seven. with hillary clinton away from the campaign trail, late today, former president bill clinton defended the foundation's work. maurice he said if there is something wrong with creating jobs and saving lives, i don't know what it is. >> julianna goldman. in washington. >> coming up next -- when children die in hot cars, why do some parents face charges and others don't. and, later, a major american city. ? music ? extraordinary starts here. new k-y intense.
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this year at least 27 children in this country have died after being left inside hot cars. and about half the cases, some one, usual a parent or guardian has faced criminal charges. but critics say, race plays a charged and who doesn't. and they point to two recent cases in mississippi as proof. here is mark strassmann. >> it felt like every part of me just -- just was torn into pieces. >> reporter: this was the moment last may that haunts joshua blount. outside the restaurant where he works, the 25-year-old discovered his daughter shania had been trapped inside the hot car for four hours.
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world is shut down. just knowing her last words were "daddy." >> reporter: blount had forgotten to drop off his 8-month-old with his grandmother. >> this is not reechlt it al. >> reporter: arrested for second degree murder, a ge a week earlier, 90 miles away, a 2 year owed, caroline bryant died after spenting eight hours in a hot car. her 37-year-old white mother was not charged. lawyer carlos moore represents joshua blount. how do you explain the difference? >> racism. and to a lesser extent, maybe gender bias. >> reporter: in both cases, parents were rushing to work.
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professor matt steffi of mississippi college law school sees unfairness in blount's criminal charge. >> if you are in the right jurisdiction you are a treated as a grieving parent or perhaps you meet the right gender and race expectations treated as a grieving parent. >> reporter: beau prosecutors who decided to press charges never returned our calls. blount's girlfriend and their baby's mother says she has forgiven him. >> i will take full responsibility. >> reporter: josh blount faces up to 20 years behind bars but says nothing could punish him more than his own anguish. >> tell me this is not real. >> reporter: mark strassmann, cbs news, grenada, mississippi. up next, police conducting secret patrols from high above a big u.s. city. add finish? jet-dry? in the rinse aid compartment. it's there for a reason. it dries much better than detergent alone.
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you down. today you can do everything in just one click, even keep your toilet clean and fresh. introducing lysol click gel. click it in to enjoy clean freshness with every flush. lysol. start healthing. ? yeah, click ? for months, police in baltimore have been conducting aerial surveillanc to investigate crimes. it was a closely guarded secret until now. here is kris van cleave. >> cbs news.com first report add but the camera technology last year when we visited persistence surveillance headquarters. from wide angle cameras mounted on a small plane the company sees 32 square miles, transmitting images live and instantly archiving them alug police to essentially rewind
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for signs of unrest the day officer caesar goodson was found not guilty in freddie gray's death. a fact the police did not publicly disclose until today. >> the only people should be concerned in baltimore are criminals. >> t.j. smith defended technology which he says led to at rest of this man wanted for shooting two elderly people in february. >> we are going to do whatever we can to go after those who choose to harm our city. >> reporter: while the are not high resolution, people and cars appear as dots that can be followed allowing police to sync sccameras on the ground. do you've feel like it is spying? >> it is spying. >> this man wants the program shut down. >> i hates to use the term, big brother. it is overused. this is big brother. a big eye in the sky watching a city at once. >> reporter: the system was originally developed for the military in iraq to find people
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and ohio have tested this technology. >> kris van cleave in washington.
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finally tonight. billboards are popping up all over the country with an eye catching message. we sent dean reynolds to get the story behind the signs. >> the direct message that graces a chicago interstate could well reflect the viewpoint of a lot of americans.
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>> neighbors don't realize that muslims are absolutely opposed to isis. isis actually kills more muslims than anybody else. >> imam malik mujahid of chicago is the force behind the blunt billboards and credits young muslim whose came up with the exact expression. >> reporter: pretty direct langu language? >> young people are sick and tired of sophisticated wage. >> reporter: he told us the attacks in europe and here in this country moved his community to be more active in their opposition to radicals. there is another blaring billboard in phoenix. and he says he has requested for more from 15 cities. all are funded by local muslim communities. >> isis and islamophobes are the two sides of the same coin.
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hate, anger in america. which is dividing a beautiful nation. >> with isis implicated or accused in acts of terror around and across the west and attempts to recruit western young people to the cause and the caliphate, the imam says american muslims are frustrated and in some cases frightened. but history he says holds out hope. >> kkk was defeated by good christians. isis needs to be defeated by go instead of weapons. dean reynolds. cbs news, chicago. that is the "overnight news" for this thursday. for some of you the news continues. for others, check back with us a little later for the morning news and cbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new
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? ? >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." welcome to the "cbs overnight news," i'm jericka duncan. the president shial campaign tr is becoming a rocky road for trump. 45% to 33%. but 22% said they would rather not vote for either one. meanwhile, the controversy over donations to the clinton foundation continues to grow. "the washington post" and "usa today" both ran editorials calling on the clintons to close the foundation or transfer operations to another charity. an ap investigation found that half of the people out of government who met with clintons
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clinton foundation. nancy cordes has more. >> reporter: this report is creating new perception problem for the clinton kachl campaign foundation that donors got no special treatment by secretary clinton. clinton herself hasn't weighed in on the controversy because she spent most of the past three days out of the public eye, courting campaign donors in california. >> lie after lie after lie. hillary clinton is totally unfit to hold public office. >> reporter: in austin, trump accused the clintons of running a criminal enterprise. >> it is impossible to figure out where the clinton foundation ends and the state department begins. >> reporter: he cited the new analysis by the associated press which examined hillary clinton's
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private individuals who got meetings or phone calls with her, had donated to the foundation. either personally or through their organization. >> this is why i have called for a special prosecutor to look into this mess. >> reporter: his allies followed suit. >> special prosecutor. >> do the right thing. apin the a special prosecutor. >> reporter: the clinton campaign fired back saying the distorted portrayal of the secretary's schedule. they added meetings with humanitarians like melinda gates or nobel prize winner, were squarely in the purview of america's top diplomat. they also rejected trump's call for a special prosecutor. >> it is an act of desperation on his campaign given the turmoil that we have seen from his campaign in recent weeks. >> reporter: newly released
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abedin, from danny abraham were able to nab last minute meetings with clinton with one call to abedin. state department officials say there is no evidence that donors got any special favors. the fbi director decleaned to say last month whether agents had looked into the foundation connection? >> i am not going to comment. not going to answer that. >> reporter: the term special prosecutor strikes fear in the hearts of long-time clintonites who recall when kenneth star was whitewater controversy. an investigation that mess tas si included paula jones, monica lewinsky, and led to bill clinton's impeachment. >> donald trump has the his own problems trying to walk back from his vow to deport 11 million undocumented immigrants. major garrett reports. >> donald trump has gone from calling for immediate deportation of undocumented immigrants to reviewing, looking
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where trump will ultimately land is anyone any guess. we asked his runningmate. he told us, details could be days, possibly months away. >> hillary clinton wants to fling open the floodgates to our borders, let everybody come in. open up our country. >> reporter: donald trump warned of his rival's immigration policies even as he redesigned his own. >> and your children did not die appearing with mothers victimized by undocumented criminals, cltrump linked clinton's approach to more crime. >> wants people to renew their visas without removal. one lawless order after another. >> reporter: despite his repeated calls for mass deportations, trump signals he may make exceptions. >> we have some great people in the country.
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for days. he is looking for a way out of rounding up some 11 million undocumented u.s. residents. >> there can be a softening. >> we saw clarity from trump's runningmate. mike pence following a rally in philadelphia. >> donald trump going to deport all 11 million undocumented immigrants in this country? >> trim has been very clear from the beginning. that we are going to secure our borders. build a wall. to do it. clear, major, he is going to enforce the laws of the country which the president of the united states takes an oath of office to do. >> that means deporting all 11 million people. >> people who have run afoul of the law, got to leave immediately. >> leave immediately. >> upholding and enforcing our laws is exactly what donald trump is going to do. the details and how we do that, we'll work that out with the congress. >> a cbs news poll shows about 60% of registered voters believe him early clinton and donald
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worthy. juliana goldman has the story. >> beth candidates criticized by members of their own party for failing to be open, transparent. trump under fire for not releasing his tax returns. remember, bernie sanders, hammered clinton for not releasing transcripts of paid speeches to wall street. the examples and more raise questions of what they may be saying and doing in private that is dif friend from what they're promising voters on the campaign trail. >> no press conference in 2,55 days. >> he refuses to release his tax returns. >> reporter: donald trump and hillary clinton regularly accuse their rival of hiding secrets. both nominees skirted basic standards of transparency. >> i'll release them when the audit is completed. >> since 1976, every presidential nominee released their tax returns. trump says he won't follow suit under audit. >> i built an unbelievable company. >> the returns would shine a light on the mogul's finances.
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interest if he were to be president. >> clinton fought back, persist enlt criticisms for deleting thousands of e-mails compose while secretary of state. while she sat down for interviews with reporters, since december she hasn't opened herself up to this kind of length. >> lot me unpack your multiple questions. >> uncontrolled. rapid-fire questioning abut that and other controversies that could dog her as president. >> now that i aim for president. >> over the same period in 2008, senator obama held four press conferences. donald trump has held at least seven. >> i think the political press is among the most dishonest people i have ever met. >> reporter: both 2016 candidates keep reporters at a distance t neither allow reporters into their fundraisers. unlike in 2008 and 2012 when obama, senator john mccain and mitt romney allowed journalists to cover portions of what they
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a mysterious black slime on the move. taking over historic buildings from angerwat in cam bedoya to the lincoln memorial in washington, d.c. mike albert has the the story. mall. washington, jefferson, lyndon. but generations after they cemented their legacies something is tarnishing their image. this is the slime. >> this is the slime. >> reporter: a black mass is spreading like a disease over the marble of washington, d.c. abraham lincoln, the great ee mans pay -- emancipators, the park service hasn't freed the 16th president's memorial from the
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see the dark spot. starting to creep down. >> reporter: the park service says the substance is actually a biofilm. made up of 1,000 different bacteria and mold and species that adhere themselves to stone surfaces. it is called slime, but when you tauch touch it, it is dry. doesn't come off on fingers. >> again, all microscopic. nothing we will pickp touch. he says experts don't know where the biofilm came from or how to get rid of it. it is also now in arlington national cemetery. and on the washington monument. but it is by far the worst at the jefferson memorial where the white dome is now covered in patches of black. >> we have no intention of allowing nature to take its course. and, and again, cover a gloriously white marble rotunda
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the expeermenting. >> this is your test lab? >> these are the test labs. if you will. untreated biofilm. the black over here. and the 10, test strips we put done to this. two weeks ago. we are seeing a couple week's worth of change. the two on the end here. very noticeable. >> this one clearly cut a swath through the biofilm but left the orange hue. >> the orange. one thing we are how long does that remain? >> the park service went public with the slime mystery this month. after people kept confusing the blackness with dirt. and complained, loudly, that the agency wasn't keeping the memorials clean. seeing the black ooze was a shock to the styles family of new hampshire. one of three million people to visit the memorial each year. >> we were a little taken aback by it. we expect them to be crystal clean. but we loved visiting the memorials. thought it was awesome.
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signs letting people know about the battle. and received at least 100 cleaning tips from the public. including jane weiber of florida who suggested water. >> needs to come off. >> you don't like the sight of it. >> no, no, it is kind of ugly. got to clean it. >> judy jacob. conservator at park service in new york helped assemble a global team of scientists, microbiologists and architects trying to create a slime antid antidote. w biofilm aside from an aesthetic problem, is causing damage to the marble or protecting the marble. >> must be frustrating not to know where it came from and not to know how to get rid of it? >> very frustrating. one of the things mort we look into it, the more questions we ask, the more we come up with. all sorts of theories and ideas. but to date there is is no known
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thomas jefferson may have helped propel the redcoats. so far there has been no luck stopping the blackcoats now invading the nation's capital. mark albert. joe manchion find himself in the hot seat over the spy spiraling cost of a life saving drug. manchion's daughter is ceo of mylan, the company raised the price of the epipen, treats sa treats severe reactions. she raised her salary to $19 million last year. manchion, received $60,000 in campaign contributions from mylan will not comment. colleagues are calling for a congressional investigation. >> one of 50 americans including children are at risk for severe allergic reactions an epipen is designed to to stop. families have seen their out of
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so we thought might be interesting to hear from the man who knows about the business of raising drug prices. >> this particular drug is aness ses tees -- necessity. >> important medicine should be expensive. they're valuable. >> former pharmaceutical chief, gained notoriety last year, by ratcheting up the cost of malaria and hiv medication by 5,000 person. he defends the epipen's increase. from a in 2009 to more than $600 this year. everyone can understand in a free market, the dollars rule. however these are life-saving drugs. people don't have a choice whether they can buy them or not. >> yeah, that's up to insurance to pay for them. like i said. $300. my iphone is $700. >> you don't need an iphone to exist. >> it doesn't matter. it's $300.
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listic, they're taking advantage of the patient. >> the epipen faces little competition. and klted for 87% of all epinephrine prescriptions farm sees filled last year and included sales from a competing brand which since recalled its product. >> we gave her a cash spechlt w, her throat closed up. >> the democratic seminar understands the importance of the epipen. she first learned her daughter needed one. when she was 4 years old. >> i still remember the panicked in grand murray, minnesota. didn't know if she would make it. couldn't breathe. she is calling phone the federal trade commission to investigate whether mylan violated antitrust laws. >> to do that to a parent. off to tell them, "well, yeah, that costs $100 five years ago. now it kcosts $600. that can't happen in the country. mylan said the epicenter price
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value the product provides. adding we made a significant investment to support the device. republican senator chuck grassley is asking the company to explain the changes mylan has made that caused it to increase the price. >> i know you are smiling. i am serious. >> she smirked and took the fifth when lawmakers questioned him abut his own price increase. he has been indicted. in an unrelated securities fraud case. but says in his opinion, the >> mylan found themselves in my shoes. they bought a company. a lot of old medicines. old medicines had old prices that weren't reflective of modern prices. $300. raising slowly. 15% every six months. which is relatively slowly. not as fast as the what i did. mylan thinks they could sell it for $1,000 a syringe. with, now with the news reports they probably won't. >> the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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>> animated bugs singing beatles music. the sounds they that sent teenage girls into a frenzy when they first heard them on the ed sullivan show in 1964. ? sunset she was just 17 ? ? i'm a loser ? >> big name artists including james cord spent are getting in on the act covering the most famous band in pop music history. ? i'm not what iea i'm really not. >> beat bug creator, managed a musical miracle by attaining the right to the beatles catalog. known as one of the most protected in pop music. >> so how in the world did you get the rights to the beatles music. did you have to go the long, winding road. what did you have to do? >> through penny lane. been told by everyone to give up. but i could just see it so clearly. i was so magnetized by the idea of bringing, you know, music
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timeless back in this whole new way. >> good day sunshine. good day sunshine. >> wakely's passion for the beatles kept him going as he was running out of money. for three years he repeatedly pitched his vision in meetings he described as -- >> they're all scary. i kind of feel like if you are not scared half the time. not living. they're all, they're all like that. ? ? >> reporter: within hours of sealing the deal, wakely began reaching out to rockers like pearl jam's eddie vedder. takes the bugs on a magical mystery tour. ? lucy in the sky with diamond." pink sings lucy in the sky with diamond. sic sia covers blackbird.
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? take these sunken eyes and learn to see ? >> next season will include rod stew stewart, james bay and jennifer hudson. each has a bit of beatle mania. >> you can't be an artist if you are not influenced by the beatles. >> my son, his middle name is actually -- max mccartney corden. after sir paul m that. >> wakely admits he feels the weight of this once in a lifetime opportunity industry insiders believe if beat bugs is successful, the music of the fab four will play on. far into the future. >> there will come a time when, when the sort of sul churl context, the beatles music came from will be forgotten and we won't think of the 60s and political climate. the celebrity and personality of the beatles themselves.
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>> he is presenting himself. >> reporter: wakely's cartoon career is exploding. >> i left you by the house of fun. >> he just teamed up with r & b singer, songwriter, smoky robinson for an animated series. >> you get this done. then you feel like, you know what. let me tackle another crazy genre with i will bring motown to life. who are you looking at for the motown. that guy is a living legend in the true sense of the word. natural successor to motown is pharrell. ripe for reinvention. >> whackly has access to the motown catalog. features, 3,700 songs. the beatles remain number one. selling, 178 million albums in the u.s. alone. big numbers for a man who dared to dream big. >> everyone should pursue an
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today marks the 100th anniversary of the founding of the national park service. taking you on a tour of some of america's national treasures. latest stop, joshua tree national park. connor nighten reports. ungraceful form, makes them to the traveler, the most repulsive tree in the vegetable kingdom. that's how john c. freemont described his encounter with the joshua tree in 1944. today that bizarre, ungraceful form is exactly what travelers find beautiful. >> i don't know maybe we tend to gravitate towards so many things that are linea in today's world. i kind of like the abstract
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>> michael roy is one of the 1.6 million visitors a year. who flock to joshua tree national park. a place where the, namesake attraction is a bit of a misgnomer. >> well, one thing about it, it is not really a tree. it's a member of the yucca family. the latin name -- it was called the joshua tree in the 100s when some of the mormon settlers came through. they thought it looked like biblical character, joshua, arms outstretched. >> the public information officer for the park. but say, joshua tree, around the world, and the first thing to come to mind, probably isn't a plant. thanks to an irish rock band's obsession with the american southwest. it is also one of the best selling albums of all time. ? well i still haven't found
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park than anybody in the world. it was a very successful album. a lot of people, particularly around the world, never been to this part of the country didn't, didn't know what a josh ua tree was. >> reporter: u2 fans are often disapin theed to learn they haven't found what they're looking for. the actual joshua tree from the album was located close to death valley, 200 miles north and died 15 years ago. is short-lived. because with so many different trees to choose from, over 1.5 million in the park, you're bound to find the one that speaks to you. >> they're all very unique looking. in a way that it feels like they almost have their own personality. do you see that when you drive by looking at them? >> they're like fingerprints. that's why you generally went see any two mature trees that look the same. >> that's the overnight news for this thursday.
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from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm jericka duncan. ? ? breaking news. tornados in the heartland. twisters are reported in central indiana. we'll have the latest on the >> also tonight, a frantic search for survivors in central italy. after an earthquake reduces resort towns to rubble. more than 100 are dead, many of them children. >> parents accidentally leave young kids to die in hot cars. >> just feels like your whole world is shut down. just knowing her last words were
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>> a tragedy, but is it a crime. allegations that race is a factor in who gets charged. and a message from muslim-americans. >> k.k.k. was defeated by good christians. isis needs to be defeated by good muslims. >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." later today, indiana will be assessing the damage and cleaning it up after tornados struck the state. the twisters hit yesterday near indianapolis and about 50 miles north in the kokomo area. vinita nair has the the latest. >> reporter: drivers in kokomo captured the twister as the it formed. >> oh, my gosh. customers inside this restaurant captured the moment. the tornado blew the roof off the starbuck's and flattened the walls. witnesses rushed to the scene to help those inside. the tornado also blew through this apartment complex, breaking windows, tossing cars, and scattering debris as far as the
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truck, toppled on top of each other. amid fallen trees and dangling wires. >> you can see it is good right there. >> national weather service, described the twister as large and destructive. wind blew so strong and sudden, people ran for their lives. >> i came out and -- it was just like a whole new world out here. >> 14-year-old, jalen givens was home with his sister when the tornado struck. >> it jerked the door out of my hand. i had to shut it. we ran into the bathroom. the furnace exploded. we all hid in the tub. it was scary. >> reporter: the national e process of sending foot in surveyors out to night to see how strong the tornados were and maurice to assess damage. >> vinita nair following the tornadoes tonight. overseize, a 6.2 magnitude
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residents awoke to scenes one described as dante's inferno. they were the lucky ones. at least 159 people were killed. and it is a race against time tonight to find survivors. seth doane is there. >> reporter: the frantic search for signs of life continued through the day. datesed residents tried to grasp the scale of the disaster. mostly what was pulled from the rubble was grim. but there was good news. >> stay calm this rescue worker urged an 80-year-old who was trapped and ultimately freed. the town stood since medieval towns but was no match for the 6.2 magnitude quake. how do you begin to rebuild, one resident asked us?
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when the quake rattled this mountain top town. some of the first on the scene were ordinary folk including priest favio gamerotta who heard residents calling from windows. aiuto, aiuto. >> help, help. he told us he tried to lift heavy stones with his bare hands off people who were trapped. you can see workers going from house to house. searching for a possible survivors, and you can get a sense for just how much work that takes when you see the, the scope of the devastation here. the wall completely destroyed. exposing the kitchen inside. this woman who would not give her name had just her cat, some grapes and a little bread. this is what you could save here? >> translator: yes, the police gave me a coat, she said. this is all i have left now. it took me 26 years to build my life in this place. >> reporter: you can see this search-and-rescue continues even after night has fallen here. these rural communities hit so hard by this earthquake, are
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it makes it difficult to get heavy equipment to where it is needed. >> seth doane near the epicenter tonight. turkey sent ground forces into syria today. a move that could further escalate and complicate syria's 5-year-old civil war. turkey hopes to retake a border town from isis. but also, stop the expansion of kurdish rebels who have u.s. backing. holly williams is following this. >> as turkish tanks rolled across the border today, them cover. turkey says it wants to cleanse its border of isis militants. starting with girabolis, the offensive comes on the same day that vice president joe biden arrived in turkey. trying to shore up relations with one of america's most difficult allies. though the u.s. supported today's operation, the two have a fundamental disagreement about how to tackle isis. u.s. special forces are working closely with kurdish fighters in
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but turkey says the kurdish group is a terrorist organization. with links to violence separatists. turkey recently shelled kurdish positions in syria. after they advanced across the euphrates river. a red line that is fueled turkish anxiety. another strain on america's relationship with turkey is the attempted military coup here, last month. which many turks have come to believe was supported by the u.s. today the vice president refuted that. >> the people of the united states of america, abhor what happened. and under no circumstances would support anything remotely
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the treasonous members of the military who engaged in this behavior. >> turkey is also angry because the u.s. hasn't yet extradited a moderate islamic cleric who lives in pennsylvania. and who is accused of masterminding the failed coup. but maurice, the vice president said today that the u.s. had to follow judicial process. >> holly williams on the battle raging in syria tonight. today, florida reported a second person in palm beach county infected with the zika virus. appare that brings the number of cases blamed on local mosquitoes in the state to 43. officials still believe the only areas where there is active transmission by mosquitoes is miami. and across the bay in miami beach. the "cbs overnight news"
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almost sixty million americans are affected by mental illness. together we can help them with three simple words. my name is chris noth
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this is your skin. this is your skin in the sun.
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militants attacked the american university of afghanistan today. at least four people were killed. dozens wounded. none of them were american. the university was established in kabul ten years ago and has more than 1,000 students. more now from charlie d'agata. witnesses say a large explosion blew one of the gates open. that was followed by heavy gunfire as militants stormed the campus during busy night classes. several american teachers and hundreds of students were on campus, some were struck by gunfire. others hid where they could. one jumped from a second story window to escape. among those trapped inside, was ap photographer, mossoud
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the gunman was right outside his classroom. >> i sensed the man, the terrorist was going room by room. i felt that, okay, this is it. he couldn't open the door. he just threw the grenade inside. and then we jumped and then we ran, all of it probably in two or three minutes. >> reporter: cbs news producer, ahmad mukhtar was in class and sprinted for any way out. closer, closer. and i felt, a few -- a few bullets flying over my head. and that was, for a few seconds of that. and these bullets hit me or my friend. >> reporter: as the afghan security forces battled with the militants. u.s. military officials confirmed american advisers were on the side lines. despite being surrounded by
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patrols, this is the second attack on the american university in a month. >> it is not known who is behind the university attack, maurice, but it comes amid a surge in violence to. day the defense department identified the u.s. soldier who was killed in yesterday's roadside bomb, army staff sergeant, matthew thompson of irvine, california was on patrol in helman province. thompson was 28. >> charlie d'agata following developments from london. >> 76 days until the presidential election. donald trump took his campaign to a battleground state where he is fighting an uphill battle for votes among people of color. here is major garrett. ? proud to be an american ? >> reporter: donald trump rallied in pivotal central florida and said this about his new minority outreach. >> really great with voters. >> trump is trailing in florida
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poll. part of the problem, soft support from hispanic and african-american voters. trump is trying to fix that by retooling his immigration message. one that began like this -- >> when mexico sends its people they're not sending their best. they're bringing drugs. they're bringing crime. they're rapists. >> during a televised townhall, trumba >> there certainly can be a softening. we are not looking to hurt people. >> reporter: that clashes with trump's earlier emphasis on mass deportation. >> you are rounding them all up? >> we are rounding them uppen a humane, nice way. cause they want to be ppy legalized. and by the way, i know it doesn't sound nice. but not everything is nice. >> it doesn't sound practical.
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limit deportation orders to criminals without documentation. his runningmate indiana governor mike pence still sound slightly tougher suggesting a split within the ticket. >> that means deporting all 11 million people. >> thing it means upholding the e law got to leave n afoul of immediately. >> reporter: trump's immigration plans remain vague, hard to pin down. so too, maurice, the strategy of campaigning here in mississippi. trump trails in so many battleground states. >> major garrett with the trump campaign tonight. while trump hunts for votes. hillary clinton is mining for money. julianna goldman has that. >> reporter: this may be all the public will see of hillary clinton today as she heads into a private fund raiser in california. instead of spending the end of august storming battleground states. clinton is on a money raising marathon to pay for the fall fight against donald trump. but her absence has kept her from turning the page on controversies over her e-mail and the clinton foundation. which has raised $2 billion to
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economic development. instead, she has opened herself up to attacks. >> it is impossible to tell where the clinton foundation ends and the state department begins. >> reporter: clinton's fund-raising highlights the apparent blurry lines between her family's charitable work and political ventures. of the 15 fundraisers clinton has held over the last week, who have given to the foundation. including one today by apple ceo tim cook. his co-host, executive vice president, lisa jackson is on the foundation board. while clinton is set to deliver a speech tomorrow in nevada her time away from the trail has given trump other ammunition. >> no press conference in what, 255 days. >> i think we are ready to take a few questions. >> that since december. she sat down for hundreds of interviews including with "60 minutes" last month. >> but she hasn't faced the sort of uncontrolled rapid fire
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at least four press conferences. trump held at least seven. with hillary clinton away from the campaign trail, late today, former president bill clinton defended the foundation's work. maurice he said if there is something wrong with creating jobs and saving lives, i don't know what it is. >> julianna goldman. in washington. >> coming up next -- when children die in hot cars, why do hers don't.s face charges and and, later, a secret
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? music ?
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k-y intense. this year at least 27 children in this country have died after being left inside hot cars. and about half the cases, some one, usual a parent or guardian has faced criminal charges. but critics say, race plays a role in determinino charged and who doesn't. and they point to two recent cases in mississippi as proof. here is mark strassmann. >> it felt like every part of me just -- just was torn into pieces. >> reporter: this was the moment last may that haunts joshua blount. outside the restaurant where he works, the 25-year-old discovered his daughter shania had been trapped inside the hot car for four hours.
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world is shut down. just knowing her last words were "daddy." >> reporter: blount had forgotten to drop off his 8-month-old with his grandmother. >> this is not real. >> reporter: arrested for second degree murder, a charge later reduced to manslaughter. a week earlier, 90 miles away, a 2 year od, died after spending eight hours in a hot car. her 37-year-old white mother was not charged. lawyer carlos moore represents joshua blount. how do you explain the difference? >> racism. and to a lesser extent, maybe gender bias. >> reporter: in both cases, parents were rushing to work. neither was drunk or impaired.
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sees unfairness in blount's criminal charge. >> if you are in the right jurisdiction you are a treated as a grieving parent or perhaps you meet the right gender and race expectations treated as a grieving parent. >> reporter: beau prosecutors who decided to press charges never returned our calls. blount's girlfriend and their baby's mother says she has forgiven him. >> i will take full responsibility. purpose. >> reporter: josh blount faces up to 20 years behind bars but says nothing could punish him more than his own anguish. >> tell me this is not real. >> reporter: mark strassmann, cbs news, grenada, mississippi. up next, police conducting secret patrols from high above a big u.s. city. add finish? jet-dry? in the rinse aid compartment. it's there for a reason. it dries much better than detergent alone.
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for months, police in baltimore have been conducting aerial surveillance over neighborhoods. a plane with high-tech cameras to investigate crimes. it was a closely guarded secret until now. here is kris van cleave. >> cbs news.com first report add but the camera technology last year when we visited persistence surveillance headquarters. from wide angle cameras mounted on a small plane the company sees 32 square miles, transmitting images live and
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allowing police to essentially rewind time t in june that plane was flying over baltimore, watching for signs of unrest the day officer caesar goodson was found not guilty in freddie gray's death. a fact the police did not publicly disclose until today. >> the only people should be concerned in baltimore are criminals. technology which he says led to at rest of this man wanted for shooting two elderly people in february. >> we are going to do whatever we can to go after those who choose to harm our city. >> reporter: while the cameras are not high resolution, people and cars appear as dots that can be followed allowing police to sync cameras on the ground. do you've feel like it is spying? >> it is spying. >> this man wants the program shut down. >> i hates to use the term, big brother. it is overused. this is big brother. a big eye in the sky watching a city at once. anting bombs.q to find people police agencies in california
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>> kris van cleave in washington. >> coming up next, muslim-americans, post a message to isis.
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y23ivy yi0y
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finally tonight. billboards are popping up all over the country with an eye catching message. we sent dean reynolds to get the
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graces a chicago interstate could well reflect the viewpoint of a lot of americans. in this case, it's a group of muslim-americans. >> neighbors don't realize that muslims are absolutely opposed to isis. isis actually kills more muslims than anybody else. >> imam malik mujahid of chicago is the force behind the blunt billboards and credits young muslim whose came up with the exact expression. >> reporter: pretty direct language? >> young people are sick and tired of sophisticated language. so they came up with the lack wage. >> reporter: he told us the attacks in europe and here in this country moved his community to be more active in their opposition to radicals. there is another blaring billboard in phoenix. and he says he has requested for more from 15 cities. all are funded by local muslim
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>> isis and islamophobes are the two sides of the same coin. which is hurting islam as well as human team. they're increasing the fear, hate, anger in america. which is dividing a beautiful nation. >> with isis implicated or accused in acts of terror around and across the west and attempts to recruit western young people to the cause and the caliphate, the imam says american muslims are frustrated and in some cases frightened. but history he says holds out hope. >> kkk was defeated by good christians. isis needs to be defeated by good muslims. instead of weapons. dean reynolds. cbs news, chicago. that is the "overnight news" for this thursday. for some of you the news continues. for others, check back with us a little later for the morning news and cbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm maurice dubois. ?
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>> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." welcome to the "cbs overnight news," i'm jericka duncan. the presidential campaign trail is becoming a rocky road for clinton. a new nationa voters shows her with a 12-point lead over donald trump. 45% to 33%. but 22% said they would rather not vote for either one. meanwhile, the controversy over donations to the clinton foundation continues to grow. "the washington post" and "usa today" both ran editorials calling on the clintons to close the foundation or transfer operations to another charity. an ap investigation found that half of the people out of government who met with clintons
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nancy cordes has more. >> reporter: this report is creating new perception problem for the clinton campaign and foundation that donors got no special treatment by secretary clinton. clinton herself hasn't weighed in on the controversy because she spent most of the past three days out of the public eye, courting campaign no california. >> lie after lie after lie. hillary clinton is totally unfit to hold public office. >> reporter: in austin, trump accused the clintons of running a criminal enterprise. >> it is impossible to figure out where the clinton foundation ends and the state department begins. >> reporter: he cited the new analysis by the associated press which examined hillary clinton's daily schedules as secretary of state and found 85 of the 154
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foundation. either personally or through their organization. >> this is why i have called for a special prosecutor to look into this mess. >> reporter: his allies followed suit. >> special prosecutor. >> do the right thing. appoint the special prosecutor. apin the a special prosecutor. >> reporter: the clinton campaign fired back saying the secretary's schedule. they added meetings with humanitarians like melinda gates or nobel prize winner, were squarely in the purview of america's top diplomat. they also rejected trump's call for a special prosecutor. >> it is an act of desperation on his campaign given the turmoil that we have seen from his campaign in recent weeks. >> reporter: newly released e-mails from clinton aide, huma abedin, from danny abraham were able to nab last minute meetings with clinton with one call to
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there is no evidence that donors got any special favors. the fbi director declined to say last month whether agents had looked into the foundation connection? >> i am not going to comment. not going to answer that. >> reporter: the term special prosecutor strikes fear in the hearts of long-time clintonite an investigation that included paula jones, monica lewinsky, and led to bill clinton's impeachment. >> donald trump has the his own problems trying to walk back from his vow to deport 11 million undocumented immigrants. major garrett reports. >> donald trump has gone from calling for immediate deportation of undocumented immigrants to reviewing, looking at options, anything but that
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is anyone's guess. we asked his runningmate. he told us, details could be days, possibly months away. >> hillary clinton wants to fling open the floodgates to our borders, let everybody come in. open up our country. >> reporter: donald trump warned of his rival'smm policies even as he redesigned his own. >> and your children did not die in vain. appearing with mothers victimized by undocumented criminals, trump linked clinton's approach to more crime. >> wants people to renew their visas without removal. one lawless order after another. >> reporter: despite his repeated calls for mass deportations, trump signals he
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the country. >> during a television townhall, trump said what has been obvious for days. he is looking for a way out of rounding up some 11 million undocumented u.s. residents. >> there can be a softening. because we are not looking -- >> we saw clarity from trump's runningmate. indiana governor mike pence following a rally in philadelphia. >> donald trump going to deport all 11 million undocumented immigrants in this country? donald trump has been very clear from the beginning. that we are going to secure our borders. build a wall. to do it. and he has also made it very clear, major, he is going to enforce the laws of the country which the president of the united states takes an oath of office to do. >> that means deporting all 11 million people. >> people who have run afoul of the law, got to leave immediately. >> leave immediately. >> upholding and enforcing our laws is exactly what donald trump is going to do. the details and how we do that, we'll work that out with the congress. >> a cbs news poll shows about
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are not honest or trust worthy. juliana goldman has the story. >> reporter: both candidates criticized by members of their own party for failing to be open, transparent. trump under fire for not releasing his tax returns. remember, bernie sanders, hammered clinton for not releasing transcripts of paid speeches to wall street. the examples and more raise questions of what they may be saying and doing in private that is different from what they're promising voters on the campaign trail. >> no press conference in what >> he refuses to release his tax returns. >> reporter: donald trump and hillary clinton regularly accuse their rival of hiding secrets. both nominees skirted basic standards of transparency. >> i'll release them when the audit is completed. >> since 1976, every presidential nominee released their tax returns. trump says he won't follow suit under audit. >> i built an unbelievable company. >> the returns would shine a light on the mogul's finances.
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interest if he were to be president. >> clinton fought back, persist ent criticisms for deleting thousands of e-mails compose while secretary of state. while she sat down for interviews with reporters, since december she hasn't opened herself up to this kind of length. >> let me try to unpack your multiple questions. >> uncontrolled. rapid-fire questioning abut that and other controversies that could dog her as president. >> president. >> over the same period in 2008, senator obama held four press conferences. donald trump has held at least seven. >> i think the political press is among the most dishonest people i have ever met. >> reporter: both 2016 candidates keep reporters at a distance t neither allow reporters into their fundraisers.
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mitt romney allowed journalists to cover portions of what they said to top donors. clinton has two campaign events scheduled for the month. at least eight fundraisers this week. trump has five. polident's unie micro clean formula works in just 3 minutes, killing 99.99% of odor causing bacteria. for a cleaner, fresher, brighter denture every day. i love you so much. that's why i bought six of you... for when you stretch out. i want you to stay this bright blue forever... that's why you will stay in this drawer... forever. i can't live without you. and that's why i will never, ever wash you. protect your clothes from the damage of the wash with downy fabric conditioner. it not only softens and freshens... it helps protect clothes... from stretching, fading and fuzz...
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a mysterious black slime on the move. taking over historic buildings from angerwat in cambodia to the lincoln memorial in washington, d.c. mike albert has the the story. mall. washngton, jefferson, lincoln. but generations after they cemented their legacies something is tarnishing their image. this is the slime. >> this is the slime. >> reporter: a black mass is spreading like a disease over the marble of washington, d.c. abraham lincoln was the great emancipator, but so far, the park service hasn't freed the 16th president's memorial from the
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see the dark spot. starting to creep down. >> reporter: the park service says the substance is actually a biofilm. made up of 1,000 different bacteria and mold and species that adhere themselves to stone surfaces. it is called slime, but when you touch it, it is dry. doesn't come off on fingers. >> again, all microscopic. touch. he says experts don't know where the biofilm came from or how to get rid of it. it is also now in arlington national cemetery. and on the washington monument. tches of black. covered in the >> we have no intention of allowing nature to take its course.
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with a blackened bio film. >> the park service is going on the offensive. >> this is your test lab? >> these are the test labs. if you will. untreated biofilm. the black over here. and the 10, test strips we put done to this. two weeks ago. we are seeg worth of change. the two on the end here. very noticeable. >> this one clearly cut a swath through the biofilm but left the orange hue. >> the orange. one thing we are determining. how long does that remain? >> the park service went public with the slime mystery this month. after people kept confusing the blackness with dirt. and complained, loudly, that the agency wasn't keeping the memorials clean. seeing the black ooze was a w hampshire. styles family of one of three million people to visit the memorial each year.
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clean. but we loved visiting the memorials. thought it was awesome. we did notice on a lot of them. >> the park service, posted signs letting people know about the battle. and received at least 100 cleaning tips from the public. including jane weiber of florida who suggested water. >> needs to come off. >> you don't like the sight of it. >> no, no, it is kind of ugly. got to clean it. >> judy jacob. conservator at park service in new york helped assemble a global team of scientists, microbiologists and architects trying to create a slime antidote. >> we don't know yet if the biofilm aside from an aesthetic problem, is causing damage to the marble or protecting t >> must be frustrating not to know where it came from and not to know how to get rid of it? >> very frustrating. one of the things mort we look into it, the more questions we ask, the more we come up with. all sorts of theories and ideas. but to date there is is no known permanent solution to get rid of biofilm. it is growing faster each year.
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mark albert. west virginia's senator joe manchion finds himself in the hot seat over the spy spiraling cost of a life saving drug. manchion's daughter is ceo of mylan, the company raised the price of the epipen, which treats severe allergic reactions by 500%. million last year. manchion, received $60,000 in campaign contributions from mylan will not comment. colleagues are calling for a congressional investigation. >> one of 50 americans including children are at risk for severe allergic reactions an epipen is designed to to stop.
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pocket costs rise, by hundreds of dollars. so we thought might be interesting to hear from the man who knows about the business of raising drug prices. >> this particular drug is a necessity. >> important medicine should be expensive. they're valuable. >> former pharmaceutical chief, gained notoriety last year, by ratcheting up the cost of malaria and hiv medication by 5,000%. he defends thepi from about $100 for a two-pack in 2009 to more than $600 this year. everyone can understand in a free market, the dollars rule. however these are life-saving drugs. people don't have a choice whether they can buy them or pay for them.up to insurance like i said. $300. my iphone is $700. >> you don't need an iphone to exist. >> it doesn't matter. it's $300. 90% of americans are insured.
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practice, monolistic. they're taking advantage of the patient. >> the epipen faces little competition. and accounted for 87% of all epinephrine prescriptions farm pharmacies filled last year and included sales from a competing brand which since recalled its product. >> we gave her a cashew, her throat closed up. >> the democratic seminar understands the importance of the epipen. she first learned her daughter needed one. when she was 4 years old. >> i still remember the panicked drive to the hospital. in grand murray, minnesota. didn't know if she would make it. couldn't breathe. she is calling phone the federal trade commission to investigate whether mylan violated antitrust laws. >> to do that to a parent. off to tell them, "well, yeah,
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that can't happen in the country. mylan said the epicenter price changed over time to belter reflect product features and value the product provides. adding we made a significant investment to support the device. republican senator chuck grassley is asking the company to explain the changes mylan has made that caused it to increase the price. >> i know you are smiling. i am serious. >> she smirked and took the fifth when lawmakers questioned him abut his own price increase. he has been indicted. in an unrelated securities fraud case. but says in his opinion, the epipen remains a bargain. >> mylan found themselves in my shoes. they bought a company. a lot of old medicines. old medicines had old prices that weren't reflective of modern prices. $300. raising slowly. 15% every six months. which is relatively slowly. not as fast as the what i did. mylan thinks they could sell it for $1,000 a syringe. with, now with the news reports they probably won't. right back.overnight news" will
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? music ? new k-y intense. a stimulating gel that takes her pleasure to new heights. k-y intense. the music of the beatles is being reborn and performed by bugs. kevin frasier has the story. ? help ? ? help ? >> reporter: you may know the song. but you have never seen it performed like this. >> help.
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>> animated bugs singing beatles music. the sounds they that sent teenage girls into a frenzy when they first heard them on the ed sullivan show in 1964. ? sunset she was just 17 ? ? i'm a loser ? >> big name artists including james cord spent are getting in on the act covering the most famous band in pop music history. ? i'm not what i appear to be ? i'm really not. >> beat bug creator, managed a musical miracle by attaining the right to the beatles catalog. known as one of the most protected in pop music. >> so how in the world did you get the rights to the beatles music. did you have to go the long, winding road. what did you have to do? >> through penny lane. been told by everyone to give
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clearly. i was so magnetized by the idea of bringing, you know, music that is so extraordinary and so timeless back in this whole new way. >> good day sunshine. good day sunshine. >> wakely's passion for the beatles kept him going as he was running out of money. for three years he repeatedly pitched his vision in meetings he described as -- >> they're all scary. i kind of feel like if you are not scared half the time. not living. say. they're all, they're all like that. ? ? >> reporter: within hours of sealing the deal, wakely began reaching out to rockers like pearl jam's eddie vedder. takes the bugs on a magical mystery tour. ? lucy in the sky with diamond." pink sings lucy in the sky with diamond.
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? blackbird singing every day and night ? ? take these sunken eyes and learn to see ? >> next season will include rod stewart, james bay and jennifer hudson. each has a bit of beatle mania. >> you can't be an artist if you are not inflenced by the beatles. >> my son, his middle name is actually -- max mccartney corden. after sir paul mccartney. >> boy, you are going to carry that. >> wakely admits he feels the weight of this once in a lifetime opportunity industry insiders believe if beat bugs is successful, the music of the fab
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context, the beatles music came from will be forgotten and we won't think of the 60s and political climate. the celebrity and personality of the beatles themselves. yellow submarine ? on. reer is exploding.s cartoon >>. ? i left you by the house of fun ? >> he just teamed up with r & b singer, songwriter, smoky robinson for an animated series. >> you get this done. then you feel like, you know what. let me tackle another crazy genre with i will bring motown to life. who are you looking at for the >> stevie wonder my first concert i want to. that guy is a living legend in the true sense of the word. natural successor to motown is pharrell. ripe for reinvention. weekly has access to the motown catalog. features, 3,700 songs. the beatles remain number one. selling, 178 million albums in the u.s. alone.
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it just happened to be mine.
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today marks the 100th anniversary of the founding of the national park service. taking you on a tour of some of america's national treasures. latest stop, joshua tree national park. connor nighten reports. >> reporter: their stiff, ungraceful form, makes them to the traveler, the most repulsive tree in the vegetable kingdom. that's how john c. freemont described his encounter with the joshua tree in 1944. today that bizarre, ungraceful form is exactly what travelers find beautiful. >> i don't know maybe we tend to gravitate towards so many things
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i kind of like the abstract nature of the trees. >> michael roy is one of the 1.6 million visitors a year. who flock to joshua tree national park. a place where the, namesake attraction is a bit of a misgnomer. >> well, one thing about it, it is not really a tree. it's a member of the yucca family. the latin name -- it was called the joshua tree in the 100s when some of the mormon settlers came through. they thought it looked like biblical character, joshua, arms outstrch officer for the park. but say, joshua tree, around the world, and the first thing to come to mind, probably isn't a plant. thanks to an irish rock band's obsession with the american southwest. it is also one of the best selling albums of all time. ? well i still haven't found what i'm looking for ?
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park than anybody in the world. it was a very successful album. a lot of people, particularly around the world, never been to this part of the country didn't, didn't know what a joshua tree was. >> reporter: u2 fans are often disapin theed to learn they haven't found what they're looking for. the actual joshua tree from the album was located close to death valley, 200 miles north and died 15 years ago. but it is a disappointment that is short-lived. because with so many different trees to choose from, over 1.5 million in the park, you're bound to find the one that speaks to you. >> they're all very unique looking. in a way that it feels like they almost have their own personality. do you see that when you drive by looking at them?
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captioning funded by cbs it's thursday, august 25th, 2016. this is the "cbs morning news." the death tolloa this morning, thousands of rescue workers are still trying to pull survivors from the rubble, after a massive earthquake kills hundreds of people. a trail of devastation in indiana, after tornadoes level parts of one town. this morning, survivors are sharing stories of helping others make it out alive. >> i pulled from one side and she pulled from the other and we were able to get the couple out. and race is the latest theme

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